God’s Second Greatest Act of Love (It Might Surprise You)

If you know me, this won’t come as a surprise, but I’m a rule follower. Mostly because I strongly dislike getting in trouble. However, when it comes to driving the speed limit, I tend to curb the rule following. Especially since nine times out of ten, by the time I have everyone in the van, with appropriate attire on their feet, we’re running late.


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 20
Key Verse: “The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul; the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple.” Psalm 19:7


I’ve tried to leave earlier – I don’t know why it doesn’t work. Though in almost twenty years, I’m happy to say, I’ve only had one ticket and it happened not long after acquiring my license. (Watch, I’ll probably get one tomorrow.)

The worst part was the police officer pulled me over in the parking lot of our church Thanksgiving dinner. (Hello there so many people who know me.) To put it mildly, I was devastated and no longer in the mood to be thankful. One look at my hot mess of a face and my mother let me go home to sit in the bathtub. The fact that I’d just gotten in trouble in front of well, half my church, left me in need of bubbles, not turkey.

(Ugh, I hate getting in trouble.)

The problem is, not everyone shares my fondness for rule following. In fact, the Bible says even my preconceived notion to follow the rules (minus the speed limit) is a hoax. Psalms 3:2-3 states, “The LORD looks down from heaven on the children of man, to see if there are any who understand, who seek after God. They have all turned aside; together they have become corrupt; there is none who does good, not even one.”

Not even one – we’re a sad case. But if we did follow after God, after his precepts and rules, oh the life we would lead. Not because all would be well and dandy with wild flowers doting our every path but because of the closeness of God we would know and experience.

Obedience is the soil by which the knowing of God will grow.

1 John 2:4-5 says, “Whoever says I know him but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected.”

If you want to know God – you’ve got to obey him. Why? Because the law is the essence of God’s heart. Consider this..

God called David a man after His own heart not because he lived life perfectly (i.e. Bathsheba), but because he loved the law (see Psalm 119) and the law reflects God’s heart, expressing His nature in multiple ways. The law is good and righteous and true and so is God. “Righteous are you, O LORD, and right are your rules” (Ps. 119:137).

But unfortunately rules have gotten a bad rap. Gaining the reputation of boring, restrictive, stuffy, tiresome, tedious. A technicality not worth following. Especially God’s rules. Which the world now views as relative for some and not for others depending on how you feel that day. Or your upbringing. Or your circumstances.

A sad delusion that’s significantly damaged our relationship with God.

Because His ways are not restrictive, they’re freeing. Psalm 119:45 says, “I will walk in freedom, for I have devoted myself to your commandments” (NLT). When God’s commands are followed blessings abound (Ps. 1:1-2). Peace is given (Ps. 119:165). Understanding is gained (Ps. 119:99). The heart overflows with joy (Ps. 119:111). Comfort is received (Ps. 119:52). And something more valuable than gold is attained (Ps. 119:72).

God’s rules are like a map for living the best life possible. Turn left here, turn right there, leading to the most amazing treasure we could ever receive – God himself.

“Let my soul live and praise you, and let your rules help me” (Ps. 119:175).

Therefore, God’s second greatest act of love is right here in Exodus 20: the giving of His law. It’s not the first because “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” (John 15:13, NIV). Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection for a people like us – yeah, nothing tops that.

But for God to come down from Heaven and speak the outpourings of His heart to a people He knew couldn’t follow it and wouldn’t follow it – this is love. Yet for the purpose of guiding us and them unto himself through the work and person of Jesus Christ, God shared His desires anyway.

We call them the Ten Commandments. So important were these rules to God, He wrote them himself on two stone tablets that were to be kept in the ark of the covenant. They weren’t to go anywhere. Their permanency guiding generation after generation; even in the New Testament.

Though today the church no longer needs to follow the ceremonial law (the sacrifices) or civil law (the rules that governed Israel as a nation). The moral law (i.e. the Ten Commandments) are very much still in play.

Why? Because God’s heart didn’t change. His guidelines for life and joy and holiness are still the same. What changed was our ability to follow them. So important are these rules to God He put his own spirit within us to help. “And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules” (Ezekiel 36:27).

No longer would it be done in the old nature but with the new. In the Spirit, instead of the flesh. In Christ’s strength, instead of our own. “I can do all things through him who strengthens me” (Phil. 4:13). (The true essence of that verse.)

Yet God knew we couldn’t keep His rules perfectly and it’s perfection he requires. Thus, we’re saved by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, not by keeping the law. Redeemed by the blood of the Lamb, just as Israel was. (Giving us all the more reason to obey Him!)

God’s heart is before us in Exodus 20. Just as we set rules for our kids because we love them, our Father cared enough to set rules for us. It’s not out of spite He’s asked us to live a certain way, it’s out of love. “The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul” (Ps. 19:7).

He’s not only a God who loved us enough to give us His son, He’s a God who loved us enough to give us His law.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
How do you view God’s laws? As suggestions? Commands? Relevant or no longer necessary?
Are the Ten Commandments something you still try to live by today?
Why is the giving of the law a loving act of God?

Subscribe Today
And never miss another Deeper Devo.
We respect your privacy.

The Role of a Believer. It May Surprise You.

Monumental spiritual moments don’t come every day. Though I wouldn’t mind if they did. Do you know the kind I’m talking about? The undeniable moments God makes his power and faithfulness so clear, you must cease what you’re doing to take it in. At times it’s simply been a verse leaping off the page of my Bible into the gaps of my anxious heart; filling me with assurance I’d prayed to gain the day before.


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 19:1-8
Key Verse: “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.” 1 Peter 2:9


Other times, it’s been an answered prayer, a protection, or a perfectly timed word of encouragement from a friend. A vivid reminder, my God is faithful. Perhaps I’ve jarred your memory to a few of your own monumental moments. Well, I think it’s safe to say Moses had a few as well – some more obvious than others. And I’m willing to guess one such moment took place at the beginning of chapter nineteen -with Israel’s arrival at Mt. Sinai.

Why was this such a big deal? Because Mt. Sinai is the mountain where God first called Moses. Also called Mt. Horeb, it’s where the burning bush took place. It’s where God soothed Moses’ anxious mind with the following promise: “But I will be with you, and this shall be the sign for you, that I have sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall serve God on this mountain” (Ex. 3:12).

A lofty promise. One only attainable by a sovereign God. But here in Exodus 19, it’s fulfilled. They’d made it, just as God said. With every Israelite young and old accounted for, God brought the people safely to the mountain, safely to himself (v.4). (Is there any better place to be?)

Then while all the people camped below, Moses went up to God. As though he was headed to the neighbor’s house to say hello.

(But honestly, isn’t that the goal? A relationship with the Father so embedded in my life it’s the most natural thing to knock on His door the instant I get home?)

And God said to Moses, “Tell the people of Israel: You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself.”

In other words, remind them Moses how faithful I’ve been. How I protected them. How I’ve provided. How I carried them, while they had nothing to do with it. And then say to them:

“Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine; and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation” (19:5-6a).

Freed from slavery it was time to talk about obedience. Time to talk about the guidelines, a.k.a. laws. But note God didn’t bring this up until after he saved the Israelites. If obedience to the law had been required for redemption, there never would have been a redemption.

Saved by grace to live for His glory, it’s important not to get the order confused. It wasn’t the law that saved them, it was God. But it was living according to the law that would bring them blessing.

Huge, wonderful blessings like being God’s treasured possession among all the nations.

Can we just sit in that for a minute? The world is God’s. The universe is God’s. Created by Him and for Him and through Him. Yet his most valued, most cherished belonging – is a heart fully devoted to him. Specifically, a people fully devoted to him. It’s why the church is the bride of Christ.

God loves it. It’s why His eyes “run to a fro throughout the whole earth, to give strong support to those whose heart is blameless toward him” (2 Chron. 16:9).

Additionally, the other big blessing Israel would have (if they set their minds on obedience), is to be a kingdom of priests.

Not that it was God’s desire to have them all walking around in robes with an ephod on their shirt. But a kingdom of priests in the sense that every person declared the glory and goodness of God by what they talked about, how they acted, responded, and lived in a world always a little off kilter. Pointing people to the Creator with every breath they took.

With that definition in mind, can you imagine the effect on a broken world if and when there was an entire nation of God following priests?

Yet this was God’s desire! This was God’s plan! For Israel to be a holy nation and a kingdom of priests. That they might know the blessing of sharing God’s love with others. And be the pathway by which the rest of the world could experience their own monumental spiritual moments.

But did they do it? No, they didn’t. They forsook God for idols. They set aside His laws and made up their own. Getting pulled in by the world instead of pulling the world toward God.

Then the most amazing thing happened. The most glorious of all monumental spiritual moments – God himself hung on a cross and paid the penalty for their sins. Our sins.

That we too might be His treasured possession. “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.” 1 Peter 2:9

And it’s His desire as it was for Israel that we be a holy people, a priesthood, living day after day not in robes with an ephod on our clothing, but in such a way that we lead others to Him. Declaring day by day the marvelous majesty of a God who saved us out of darkness and brought us into the light!

It’s every believer’s job to preach in this world, but not necessarily from a pulpit, though God calls some to do just that. But from the kitchen table. From the grocery store checkout lane. From the family room. From the office. (You get the idea.) Living in such a way that holiness speaks louder than hell, we preach grace and peace and love and truth to a world in desperate need of knowing Him.

But the question is, are we doing it? Are we preaching the excellencies of Christ so not just we, but they, the world, may have their own monumental spiritual moments?

It’s a job God’s granted us because he knows there’s great blessing in doing it. And a position I think it’s time we recognize. We aren’t just a people sitting around with little to do. We’re the priesthood my friend. God’s treasured possession and we’ve got a job to do.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
Whether we like it or not, everyone is preaching something. So by your actions and attitude what have you been preaching lately?
How does thinking of yourself as part of the priesthood make you want to change your behavior? Would you say you are a worthy member of the priesthood? Why or why not?

Subscribe Today
And never miss another Deeper Devo.
We respect your privacy.

Is It Religion or Is It Relationship?


During my time away (Let’s just call it an August Sabbatical…It makes me feel more important.), I not only wrote the first two chapters of a book I’ve been dreaming up for a few months now. (Who’s excited???) But I spent time studying the Kings. And I mean s-t-u-d-y-i-n-g 1 and 2 Kings. I’m not sure how I ended up there. But it was good.


Devotional Scripture: 1 Kings 15:1-8; 2 Chronicles 13:1-20
Key Verse: “And Samuel said, “Has the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to listen than the fat of rams.” 1 Samuel 15:22


If you read 1 and 2 Kings through quickly chapter after chapter, it’s like wait a minute – What guy is this? What kingdom is he with? (There were two – Israel and Judah.) Did he love God? (Chances are probably not.) It all just runs together into a big messy blob of long ago people.

There are well, a lot of kings. Twenty kings for the southern kingdom (Judah), and nineteen kings for the northern kingdom (Israel), in case you were curious. If you do the math, that’s thirty-nine kings to keep track of (not including Saul, David, and Solomon) and twenty years can go by in a matter of about three verses.

(It’s hard enough keeping track of four kids, let alone thirty-nine kings.)

But I had to try. So I went slow. I made notes. I compared 2 Chronicles verse by verse with 1 and 2 Kings. I fit in what prophet went where. I inserted some of the Psalms where theologians think they go. And I loved every minute of it. (I do kind of sort of love history though, as long as there’s no multiple-choice test involved, so I’d say that played in my favor.)

And when I came to Abijah or Abijam (depending on your translation), God was like, “No, you’re stopping here for today.” (He didn’t really say that. It was just one of those mornings a thought hit me so strongly, I couldn’t go on. Holy Spirit speaking? I think so.)

Abijah was the second king of Judah’s lengthy list. He only reigned three years. Probably taking the oath of office about 913 BC. 1 Kings 15:3 has this to say about him, “And he walked in all the sins that his father did before him, and his heart was not wholly true to the LORD his God, as the heart of David his father.”

Hmmm, not exactly what you hope the Bible will say about you. So what were the sins of his father? Well, mainly idolatry. He led the people into the worship of false gods. Setting up high places and pillars and “Asherim on every high hill and under every green tree” (1 Kings 15:23). Asherim were probably wooden in nature. I’m picturing something tall and skinny carved in the form of a woman because it represented the goddess Asherah, wife of the chief god El and mother to the other gods.

Verse 24 says Abijah also allowed male cult prostitutes in the land. Lovely eh? This guy cared little for the LORD and his commands and ways and glory.

But if you jump over to 2 Chronicles 13 you realize Abijah had a whole different view of himself. While trying to entice the northern tribes to follow him instead of Jeroboam (the northern king), Abijah had this to say, “But as for us, the LORD is our God, and we have not forsaken him. We have priests ministering to the LORD who are sons of Aaron, and Levites for the service. They offer to the LORD every morning and every evening burnt offerings and incense of sweet spices, set out the showbread on the table of pure gold, and care for the golden lampstand that its lamps my burn every evening. For we keep the charge of the LORD our God, but you have forsaken him” (2 Chron. 13:10-11).

Oh really Abijah. What about the high places? What about the Asherim? What about the male cult prostitutes? But because they kept the daily, weekly, and festival sacrifices, offered incense, set out the weekly bread, and took care of the lampstand (all things we’re going to study in Exodus), Abijah thought they were good.

Interesting. Look at the way he points the finger at Israel – “We keep the charge of the LORD our God, but you have forsaken him.” Not so Abijah. The charge of the LORD is to love him with all our heart and soul and might (Deuteronomy 6:5). Not possible when there is idolatry going on.

But it made me wonder, how many, especially in America today, are floatin’ in Abijah’s boat?

Oh I’m good, I go to church Christmas and Easter.

Oh I’m good, I went forward when I was a kid.

Oh I’m good, I say my prayers every night before bed. I give to a local charity. I do my best to love others.

All good things. But what about the heart? Look what the LORD had to say about their actions – “For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings” (Hosea 6:6).

(Clear enough.)

So concerned is God about the heart he goes so far as to say to Israel, “And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you” (Ezekiel 36:26a). A new heart! Not because they deserved it but for the sake of God’s holy name, which Israel profaned among the nations by making God into a religion.

But God desires relationship. “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me” (John 10:27).

In other words, it’s not about the stuff my friends, it’s about the stuffing. What’s in you? Apostasy? Idolatry? Or a wholeness of heart devoted to God.

Ritual without faith based obedience is unacceptable to God. Sacrifice without faith based obedience is unacceptable to God. Worship without faith based obedience is unacceptable to God.

King Abijah thought he was good but God saw his heart and it “was not wholly true to the LORD his God” (1 Kings 15:3). Which begs the question, what would the Bible say about us? Or for that matter, about a nation who professes to know His name, but their hearts remain far from Him. (Sounds so vaguely familiar, doesn’t it?)

“Has the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to listen than the fat of rams. For rebellion is as the sin of divination, and presumption is as iniquity and idolatry.” 1 Samuel 15:22-23a


My Father in Heaven, please forgive us. Help us to see it’s not about religion, but relationship. It’s not a list of do’s and don’ts. It’s a YES to Jesus because while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. In Jesus name, because he made a way, Amen.

Subscribe Today
And never miss another Deeper Devo.
We respect your privacy.

The Real Reason We’re Divided

My heart this week…

If only the world could understand it.

There’s only ever been two nations founded on godly, Biblical, principles. Israel and us (the United States). Both declaring themselves to be one nation under God.

Yet not long after Israel became a nation, it found itself divided into two kingdoms. Two sides. Two halves. Brother vs. brother fighting against each other.

Just as the United States, seems to find itself today. Still young (relatively speaking), brother vs. brother, divided over just about everything. (We could list it all but seriously who’s got time for that?)

But why? Why has our country divided? I think the answer lies with Israel.

It wasn’t because of politics Israel divided. It had nothing to do with the right verses the left. Nor was it because of health care costs. Israel found themselves divided for one reason and one reason only.

They forsook the LORD their God (1 Kings 11:31-34).

Worshiping false gods instead of the LORD. Refusing to walk in His ways. Replacing the commandments with whatever felt right in their own eyes.

Sound familiar? It sounds like today.

God says serve me, but we serve ourselves.

God says love me, but we love money and sex and Hollywood.

God says pray, but we say no.

God says “Be holy,” but we live in unrighteousness.

God says teach your children about me, but we’re too busy.

God says don’t take my name in vain, but we use it relentlessly.

And… (just to name one more)

God says flee sexual immorality but we’ve embraced it.

Which is what also led to Solomon’s downfall. The third and final king before Israel split.

“And the LORD was angry with Solomon, because his heart had turned away from the LORD…Therefore the LORD said to Solomon, “Since this has been your practice and you have not kept my covenant and my statutes that I have commanded you, I will surely tear the kingdom from you and will give it to your servant.” 1 Kings 11:9-11

But because of God’s promise to David, Solomon’s son (Rehoboam) got to keep one tribe.

Division. Not because of politics or policy but promiscuity.

Is it any wonder then, our nation is split two seams right down the middle and crumbling underneath? We’ve laid the welcome mat for sexual immorality on so many levels. And then excused it under the pretense of a television show or just one chapter in a book or the way I feel or the way I’m made.

We’ve turned a blind eye to idolatry; calling it necessity. We’ve taken truth and trampled it; calling it tolerance. We’ve sidled up next to murder; calling it women’s rights.

Well, it’s time we stop making excuses. It’s time we fess up. It’s time we wake up.

Israel divided because they did not wholeheartedly serve the LORD (1 Kings 11:6). And America? Well, it’s plain to see we’re no longer one nation under God.

And so we fight.

My friend, it’s not compromise we need. It’s not better policies. It’s not better protections for blacks or for whites. It’s Jesus we most need. It’s a common coming under of God’s word that will mend us back together. (Then the rest will take care of itself.)

Peace is not by way of men, it’s by way of Jesus. It’s by living for and with and under God’s divine and living and breathing Word.

“You are righteous, Lord, and your laws are right. The statutes you have laid down are righteous; they are fully trustworthy. My zeal wears me out, for my enemies ignore your words.” Psalm 119:137-139

Yet…

“Your promises have been thoroughly tested, and your servant loves them.” Psalm 119:140

Wholehearted obedience. That’s where it ended and that’s where it will yet begin again.

Subscribe Today
And never miss another Deeper Devo.
We respect your privacy.

When the Storm Hits, Where Will You Be?

Storms excite me. Much to the dismay of my mother-in-law whom I left alone in the basement with my four terrified children (one of which was so scared he had just thrown up), because I had to go outside to see the tornado. I know, I’m a terrible mother! Or daughter-in-law, whichever you prefer. But I had to see it! (My excuse still to this day.)


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 9: 13-35
Key Verse: “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on them.” (John 3:36, NIV)


And it was worth the peek. God’s power, vividly on display in the storm, amazes me. When I see those dark clouds billowing in the west, I get all kinds of eager. I check the three different radar apps on my phone (don’t judge) and I watch it build. Oh man, it’s coming. How’s it going to hit us? When’s it going to hit us?

Then it gets here. Standing in awe at the window I love watching Jesus direct the lightning bolts (Job 38:35). I can see for miles, each one sent to its place, standing at attention before the King of Glory. Then I count and listen; how close was it? The rumbles of thunder apparently what Heaven’s throne room sounds like (Rev. 4:5). And the closest any of us has come to hearing the audible voice of God (Job 40:9).

But I don’t think I’d have been standing by the window when the seventh plague hit Egypt. Hiding under my bed, is probably more like it. The storm unequal to anything they had ever seen, God warned Pharaoh first. “Behold, about this time tomorrow I will cause very heavy hail to fall…therefore send, get your livestock and all that you have in the field into safe shelter” (v. 18-19).

It’s coming. If you’re outside you won’t survive. Having seen enough already “whoever feared the word of the LORD among the servants of Pharaoh hurried his slaves and his livestock into the houses, but whoever did not pay attention to the word of the LORD left his slaves and his livestock in the field” (v. 20-21); much to their detriment.

The next morning, as promised, dark clouds billowed with vengeance. God flinging wide the doors to his storehouses of hail (Job 38:23), it fell hard “with fire flashing continually in the midst of the hail.” The pouring rain and thunder at a standstill over the vast kingdom, except in the land of Goshen. There, it was dry. Perhaps overcast, but I’m picturing sunny with a slight breeze out of the west and eighty-two degrees.

How long did the storm last? It doesn’t say. Long enough to break every tree in the field, strike anyone or anything caught outside, including the animals that had either been spared from the pestilence of the fifth plague or brought from neighboring countries afterwards, and crush the crops. Specifically, the flax and barley, placing the seventh plague most likely in the month of January. With the 10th plague (and thus Passover) occurring around Easter (Fitting huh?).

Growing up I pictured the plagues one right after the other. Ten plagues in ten days, but perhaps it took a year. With enough time in between each one for the Egyptians to consider their losses and their loyalties. The Egyptian gods doing nothing to protect them, can you imagine their dinner conversations? “I think we should serve the God of the Hebrews.” “What? Are you kidding?” But after the seventh plague I’m thinking there were a few more converts.

With a storm of this magnitude there was no denying God’s power or presence in the land of Egypt. God had shown up to save his people. His wrath pummeling the enemy. Incidentally, David spoke of his own rescue in similar manner, describing God’s presence as a storm.

“He made darkness his covering, his canopy around him, thick clouds dark with water. Out of the brightness before him hailstones and coals of fire broke through his clouds. The LORD also thundered in the heavens…And he sent out his arrows and scattered them; he flashed forth lightnings and routed them” (Psalm 18:10-14).

David goes on to say, “He rescued me from my strong enemy and from those who hated me, for they were too mighty for me” (v. 17). Sounds exactly like the seventh plague, don’t you think? God thundering from the heavens with hailstones, fire, and flashes of lightning.

And you know what? It’s not the last time God will show up in this manner. In the time of the great tribulation when the seventh bowl is poured out, He plans to do it again (Rev. 16:18). “And great hailstones, about one hundred pounds each” (v. 21), will fall on the enemies of His people.

In other words, it’s coming. We’ve been fair warned. The question is, will we heed the word of the LORD, get inside, and be under the covering of Christ? Or will we ignore it, as the Egyptians did, paying little attention to the caution of God.

John 3:36 says, “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on them” (NIV).

We can’t save ourselves, but we can come under the covering of Christ. “Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him!” (Romans 5:9, NIV)

By sincere, whole-hearted repentance. As opposed to Pharaoh who only went half way. Calling Moses and Aaron (because he knew they were the only ones who could fix this) he said to them, “This time I have sinned: the LORD is in the right, and I and my people are in the wrong” (v. 27). In other words, “Make it stop!”

But Moses knew it was a hoax (v. 30). Pharaoh wasn’t sorry that he was a grievous sinner, he was sorry that his crops had been grievously destroyed – his economy collapsing.

My friend, repentance is of the heart, not the heartache. To repent means to change one’s mind. In the Biblical context to repent is to change one’s mind about two things: Who we are (a sinner) and who Christ is (the Savior).

And when that happens, with genuine sincerity, you can know, you’re safe in the arms of Jesus. Brought in, and given shelter from the storm. It’s as simple as “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved” (Acts 16:31).

So seek shelter while you still can my friend; for there’s a storm brewin’ on the horizon.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
Have you trusted in Christ for salvation with a sincerity that spills forth in devotion?
Who can you share the love of Christ with today

Subscribe Today
And never miss another Deeper Devo.
We respect your privacy.

 

When It’s NOT OK to Compromise

As a farmer’s wife who built a house in the middle of a field, close enough to our hog barns it’s convenient to spread manure on, I have certain – how shall I say this – privileges, not everyone gets to experience. Like flies. Thousands upon thousands of flies in the heat of July, covering my lovely abode, like a bunch of sugar crazed elementary kids out for recess.


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 8:20-32
Key Verse: “For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death.” Romans 8:2


Dare to open the front door and recess just moved inside. The problem is when four children live in your home, you might as well take off the hinges and call it indoor/outdoor living because let’s be honest, kids don’t know how to close doors.

Anyway, with his otherwise even keeled wife (at least that’s how I like to think of myself), about to hop tractors over to the funny farm, my man did what every good husband would do: he googled it. Wherein he was told this fly bag, filled with decaying chicken scraps or spoiled milk, would trap them all. Of course we bought one.

The smell was horrid but praise be to Jesus, it worked. There were still flies, mind you, but we could once again walk outside without being attacked. (Though I still yelled kindly asked my little lovies to CLOSE THE DOOR whenever they went outside.)

The poor Egyptians however had no Google, no Amazon Prime, and no fly bags. (Sheesh, life must have been rough.) So when God sent swarms and swarms of flies to cover their land and houses and food and bodies and everything they owned – I can only imagine, it was crazy town.

Except in the land of Goshen, the part of Egypt the Israelite’s called home. There, not a fly buzzed, not a woman swatted, not a speck of land was ruined, because God protected Israel from the devastating effects of the fourth plague. Declaring it the first ever “no-fly zone” (literally) so that Pharaoh would know He is the LORD. And consequently, so would Israel and Egypt alike.

Because in every other part of the country the land was ruined (v. 24). Devoured by swarms of ruthless flies (Psalm 78:45), yet Goshen miraculously remained untouched.

This truth ruffling Pharaoh’s headdress enough he alas yielded, a little. “Go sacrifice to your God within the land” (v. 25).

Not a bad concession for a guy like Pharaoh. In fact, many would have chalked it up as a win for Moses and Aaron. (Come on guys, just take the deal.) But without hesitation, Moses declined. Telling Pharaoh, no way, no how was that going to work. “The Egyptians will stone us for having a nationwide BBQ right in front of their fly eaten faces.” (My paraphrase.)

Probably true. But the real reason Moses said no isn’t for fear of the Egyptians, but for fear of God.  The LORD’s instruction was clear, “Let my people go, that they may serve me in the wilderness” (Ex. 7:16). Not in bondage, but in freedom.

Egypt’s deliverance a picture of our salvation, it wasn’t going to work to stay in Egypt to worship God. “For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death” (Rom. 8:2). Made new in Christ, we’re free. He doesn’t lead us half way out of bondage and then tell us “That’s good enough.” No, He takes a repentant sinner all the way to victory, every single time.

The problem is, we tend to compromise. The problem is, us. Given the freedom to make choices we walk right back into Egypt. Right back into the place we’ve been comfortable in for so many years. Because it’s easier. (No one ever said living apart from the world was going to be easy.) Because it looks more fun. Because otherwise we might be labeled one of those fanatical Christians.

Or maybe because we don’t believe we’re actually free. Lured by Satan’s compromises we take the deal. We worship, but we stay in Egypt. Holding onto this habit or that one because we couldn’t really give it up. Making little allowances here and there. Going to church but carefully blending in the rest of the week. Believing the lie, we can be buddies with the world and with Jesus all at the same time, a win-win for everyone. (cf. James 4:4)

But like Moses, no way, no how, can we take the deal. It’s not what God intended. It’s not what’s He’s commanded. He’s instructed wholehearted obedience. “But as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct” (1 Peter 1:15). I know not totally possible while still in the flesh, but we’re to give it a go nonetheless.

He’s instructed us to be set apart. To be in the world but not of the world. No longer conformed, but transformed by the renewal of our minds (Rom. 12:2). Abhorring what is evil and holding fast to what is good (Rom. 12:9).

But it’s not going to happen unless we decide we’re all in. Freed from sin and death and not going back. No matter how good the deal might sound, we’re not taking it. We won’t compromise, not when it comes to God’s word. Though we know the devil will try.

As he did with Eve (And we know what happened there.) As he did with Jesus. (And we know what happened there!) And as he will do again, offering the bait of compromise over and over.

Accordingly, this is the first of three compromises offered by Pharaoh (Satan doesn’t give up easily.) The second came at the threat of locusts. Urged by his servants to “let them go already!” Pharaoh says OK fine the Israelite’s can go, but no taking the women and children! Only the men can go and sacrifice to the LORD.

Knowing he’s in a losing battle, ever seen Satan try that one? Keep us too busy, keep us distracted, keep us entertained long enough to leave our kids behind. To not teach them the ways of the LORD. Or not include them for one reason or another in the ministry we’re involved with. Maybe it’s to protect them. Or maybe like me, it’s because we’re just too tired. So they miss out at seeing the hand of God at work. They miss out on answered prayer. And then what? They grow up and walk away from Jesus.

The third suggested compromise came with the ninth plague. Pharaoh conceded that the entire family could go, as long as the herds and flocks stay behind. A bit of a problem if they were to fulfill the required sacrifices.

We see this one daily too. Don’t give God your time. Don’t give God your talents. Don’t give God your best. Those are for you to enjoy. Besides, it’s too much effort and you deserve the proceeds, not Him. (I’ve certainly been tempted, you?)

But when it came to God’s instructions Moses was nonnegotiable. And the result? A work of God in his life so marvelous it took his breath away. My friend, compromising isn’t worth it. It may look good. It may even look like a win-win, but decide today, right now, you won’t take the deal. Because when it comes to the word of God, victory is never found halfway.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
In what areas are you compromising with God’s word? Have you taken any deals?
How can you experience victory today?

Photo by Pixabay

Why I Don’t Live However I Want To

Some would say we’re strict or maybe even legalistic because my husband and I don’t drink alcohol. Nor do we sit in the bar section at restaurants or go to R rated movies or work in the fields on Sundays.


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 7:1-7
Key Verse: “As he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy.” (1 Peter 1:15-16)


We’re careful to say the least. Not because I’m sinning if I drink a beer or sit on a bar stool or buy a ticket to an R rated movie. (Sorry we’re not going there today. And FYI these are our prayerful personal convictions. I’m OK if they’re not yours.)

But we’re careful because we bare the designation Christian quite loudly. At home, at work, out and about in the land of the living. (A place I don’t always get to with littles still at home with me.) But when I do make it out the door, I just might be the closest connection my neighbor, be it the person in line behind me, or the young couple sitting next to us at The Cheesecake Factory, has ever had with God. The first line of offense in a battle for lost souls.

Ambassadors for Christ as Paul says in 2 Corinthians 5:20. That’s how we think of ourselves and we want to do well in representing our Savior.

Moses had a similar set up. As God’s representative, he was the closest connection Pharaoh had ever had to the LORD Almighty. In fact, “The LORD said to Moses, “See, I have made you like God to Pharaoh, and your brother Aaron shall be your prophet” (v. 1). Phew! No pressure, huh.

Actually, for Moses it was probably more of a relief than anything else, considering Egyptian Pharaoh’s thought of themselves as deity. One among many, but a god no less. Thus, when pharaoh spoke he never did it directly, he had a representative speak on his behalf.

So giving Moses the same arrangement not only put him on a level playing field, it was a power play Pharaoh recognized. And what’s so great, is in time, God beat Pharaoh at his own game. Giving more power to Moses, a mere shepherd, than Pharaoh ever had.

But as God’s representative it wasn’t his position Moses needed to worry about. It was his obedience. Twice in the first ten verses of chapter 7 we’re told Moses and Aaron “did just as the LORD commanded them” (v. 6 & 10). Because as God’s ambassadors there was no other way.

Just think for a moment, if Moses and Aaron had said and done whatever they wanted, what kind of picture might they have painted for Pharaoh of this God he didn’t know. A god made in their own image? A god not worthy of much respect? A weak god? A fearful god?

Considering the world’s view of God today, I’m just wondering if we’ve painted, by our improv and misguided temper and impatience and lack of restraint and indifference and otherwise sluggish spirituality, a grossly inaccurate picture of the LORD God Almighty.

One with lots and lots of smeared paint. The kind you tilt your head one way and then the other and think, “Well my four-year-old could have painted that.” (Sorry art people. I mean no disrespect.)

But as God’s representatives have we given the world a clear picture? Or have we smeared the lines beating the drum of 1 Corinthians 6:12, that all things are lawful for me in Christ, though maybe not always beneficial.

It’s for freedom Christ has set us free (Gal. 5:1). Yes, indeed I totally agree. Yet, freedom in Christ is not freedom to live however we want, it’s freedom to live exactly as He wants. In righteousness. In relationship. In ready obedience to a holy God.

Basically, it’s freedom to live in such a way that reflects the character of God. So the world will see Him in us and fall on bended knee declaring, “I want that too. A relationship with the unbelievably amazing God who made me too and died for me too and loves me too. The one I see in you.”

So God said, “As he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy”” (1 Peter 1:15-16).

Just as he told the Israelites, “For I am the LORD who brought you up out of the land of Egypt to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy” (Lev. 11:45).

Because they [Israel] had one main job to do – show the world who God is. “You are my servant, Israel, in whom I will display my splendor” (Is. 49:3). By living by Him, for Him, and through Him. A “kingdom of priests and a holy nation” (Ex. 19:6).

And the church? The same job. “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light” (1 Peter 2:9).

But what are we proclaiming? His excellencies or our own? Peter goes on to urge believers in the same passage to “abstain from the passions of the flesh which wage war against your soul.” Keeping our conduct among the gentiles honorable. Why? So they might see God in us and glorify Him.

So we live carefully. Hopefully above reproach, though nowhere near perfect. Doing our best to live uprightly in an upside-down world. Seeking daily to show the love of our good Father. By example. By self-control. By setting my rights aside. With a smile. A thank you. A patience not of myself. A helpful hand. An answer of hope.

Offering our whole bodies “as an instrument to do what is right for the glory of God” (Rom. 6:13, NLT). Because the last thing we want to do is smear the image of God in the mind of an already struggling soul.

Who needs to see a holy and righteous God who set not only His rights aside, but the splendor and glory and majesty of heaven, to hang on a cross for us – for them.

Therefore like Moses I seek, or at least try, (though some days I’m a blubbering failure) to do and say just as God’s commanded. Whether it’s easy or costly or fun or unfair. Living not however I want, but as God wants. Since He, for some marvelous reason, saw fit to make me His ambassador. (Oh the wonder of it all.)

May we today and everyday carefully consider our job as His representatives.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
What does it mean to be an ambassador of Christ? In what way, by what choices, are you seeking to reflect the biblical character of God?

Why Effective Ministry Starts at Home

Sometimes things in life are hard to understand. Like why a small pack of candy is called “fun size.” (What’s so fun about getting less candy?) Why the time of day with the slowest traffic is called rush hour. Why the guy we invest money with is called a broker. Why we call it a hamburger when there’s clearly no ham. And why the toilets in my house flush on the right side. (Go check yours and tell me the flusher isn’t on the left???)


Devotional Scripture: Exodus 4:18-26
Key Verse: “For if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church?” 1 Timothy 3:5


Scripture has some hard to understand things as well. One of those being the section of verses before us today. After finishing his conversation with the LORD at the burning bush, Moses went back to his father-in-law, Jethro, and out of respect, asked permission to go to Egypt to see if his brothers were still alive.

Which may have been partly true. It had been forty years and under the hand of harsh treatment, Moses probably wondered who had passed and who was still living. But God had made it clear his people were still alive. Which leads us to think Moses wasn’t completely honest with Jethro. Leaving out a few key details. Like the fact that God had already commanded him to go.

No matter, Jethro said yes. “Go in peace” (v.18). So with one last push from the LORD, “Go back to Egypt, for all the men who were seeking your life are dead” (v. 19), Moses set his wife and sons on a donkey and with “the staff of God in his hand” set out for Egypt.

All well and good until we get to verse 24. And our eye brows furl. And our head cocks to the side. And we think, “Well that doesn’t make any sense.” It reads, “At a lodging place on the way the LORD met him and sought to put him to death.” Say what?

After all that conversation. After all that coaxing. After all that reassuring and instructing – the LORD meets his chosen man on a path of newly trodden obedience to put him to death. (And I thought right side flushing toilets were hard to understand.)

To save her husband’s life, Zipporah “took a flint and cut off her son’s foreskin and touched Moses feet with it.” In other words, she circumcised her boy. I’m guessing the youngest (since it’s singular). And let’s just say she wasn’t happy about it, calling Moses “a bridegroom of blood.” (Them’s fightin’ words if you ask me.)

Anyway, somehow, they figured out Moses’ life hung in the balance because they hadn’t circumcised their son. A requirement for every male in a Hebrew household, whether born in the house or bought. It began with Abraham back in Genesis 17. It was the sign of the covenant. The very covenant God was now faithfully fulfilling through Moses.

But for whatever reason Zipporah didn’t want it done. Maybe the circumcision of their first born hadn’t gone well. Or maybe it felt wrong. Maybe it was just too much for her to watch or she just plain didn’t want to. (I’ve been there a time or two.)

Nonetheless, obedience to God’s commands came first. Before feelings and opinions and wants and don’t-want-tos.

Before Moses could answer the call. Before ministry could begin. Before God could use him outside his home, obedience had to take place right there with the people he loved most.

“For if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church?” (1 Tim. 3:5)

No level of ministry or calling or job outside the home, excuses us from living within the parameters God sets inside the home. If anything, ministry outside the home, heightens the need of ministry inside the home.

Yet sometimes, it feels like a lesser calling. The loving of our spouses. The teaching of Scripture to our children. The endless instructing. The talk of God’s sovereignty in a sunrise or the reminder of godly obedience in a reprimand. It feels small and repetitive.

And it’s easy to set it aside. For something of greater importance. Something with more immediate results or praise.

Or to simply let things slip. Because we’re tired. Because we’re comfortable. Because we’ll get to it later.

But how can we say it in public, if we don’t do it in private? How can we speak the Word to others, when we don’t believe it enough to live it ourselves? Though we can’t always control the outcome, of those inside (or outside) our barn wood clad decorated walls, we can, if we want to, be the example.

So important was this to God he was willing to put Moses to death. To start over. To find someone else to do the job if Moses didn’t adhere to the command of circumcising his sons.

For it was only a matter of time before he’d be reminding the Israelite’s to do the same. Passing along the LORD’s requirement of anyone, whether foreigner, slave, visitor, stranger, or relative, to be circumcised prior to eating the Passover meal. “But no uncircumcised person shall eat of it” (Ex. 12:48).

You see it wasn’t just the Israelite’s who fled the land of Egypt. There were likely Egyptians and other foreigners who tagged along in awe of the powerful God of the Hebrews. Which the LORD welcomed, but to take part in the celebration of God’s deliverance, they first had to identify themselves as one of God’s people. And that was done by circumcision. A command Moses had to live, before he could give.

If we want to be used by God, it starts at home. Faithfully, daily, adhering, to the instructions we’ve already been given. No matter how small or unimportant or tedious or hard it may seem, none of it is optional for a servant of God.

And when we obey. When we take the time to adhere to the seemingly lesser instructions. Abiding by the word of God, serving Jesus, in the spaces only those closest to us see, God will use us in the bigger, more wide open places.

But it starts in the quiet, not often viewed, seemingly unimportant, little things, of home.

Contemplate and Evaluate:
Why do you think ministry outside the home, heightens the need for ministry inside the home?
Are there areas of obedience in your personal and home life, that you’ve set aside to answer the call of ministry elsewhere? What steps can you take to fix that today?

Photo by Pixabay

Our Problem Isn’t the Government, It’s Holiness

I admit, I’m fearful. As a mother with four young children I’m deeply concerned about the future of this nation and what it holds for my littles. More than anything I want Christianity to be the religion our country holds closest to and the foundation we still stand upon.

But it’s not anymore. Biblical values are no longer the driving force behind societal right and wrongs. We gave that seat to political correctness and women’s activism quite some time ago.

Not that I don’t think men and women are created equal. Not that I don’t think women should have rights. We do and we should. But something’s gone terribly wrong in our society. And instead of facing the music. Instead of digging in to see where we may have gone wrong, fessing up to mistakes, and seeking to make it right, we just blame the government.  

Who is absolutely at fault, don’t get me wrong. We have leaders leading us in just about every wrong direction. Upholding lifestyles of immorality as good and normal. Passing abortion laws under the pretense of women’s rights instead of advocating a beautiful thing called adoption. Making decisions they have no right to make.

And it makes me want to scream. To get in the face of these so called wise people and tell them a thing or two about what I really think of them and their plans to steal the freedom of my children and belittle life.

So I yell at the TV and pray. Asking God to do something. To intercede. To bring revival. To protect me and my comfortable life. To work in the hearts of those in authority. Or remove them or replace them or keep them from putting in place rules and regulations that might hinder my lovely little existence.

Which is not wrong. We need to be praying, especially for our leaders. But I think we’ve forgotten something. (Or at least I had.) Something not necessarily easy, but important. And undeniably vital to the heartbeat of God.

I think we’ve forgotten holiness.

The setting apart of God’s people for righteousness. 1 Peter 1:15 says we are to be holy as He is holy. We are to conduct ourselves in such a way that matches the character of He who indwells us. For we are “a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession” saved to proclaim the excellencies of Christ (1 Peter 2:9). Yet what do our attitudes and actions and apathy most often proclaim?

We pray and then we go back to conformity. We ask, but then we go sit in front of the TV. Watching shows that take God’s name in vain and uphold sex outside of marriage and praise divorce and normalize weak men and applaud aggressive youth.  

We uphold Friends as one of the best sitcoms ever and post pictures of ourselves devouring reruns when almost every episode includes sexual immorality. We get more excited about the comeback of Gilmore Girls than we ever have about the coming of Christ.

We play video games that kill and we brag about it. We engross ourselves in murder mysteries and the nightly news, instead of engrossing ourselves in God’s word. Teaching our kids it’s ok to toe the line. To watch sin and laugh at it and be a part of it as long as it’s just on TV or with a gaming controller.

Which has me wondering, why would God ever want to move on behalf of such an apathetic people? A people who profess his name on Sunday’s but haphazardly throw him on the shelf Monday through Saturday. Who sit and laugh at the stuff he hates. Who live in a constant state of inconsistency. Who say they are Christians but could care less to uphold what Christ actually says.

We seek His intervention, but we don’t seek His Word. We covet His action, but we don’t covet His attributes.

Yet it’s holiness that moves God to act on behalf of his people and always has been. When the Israelites obeyed the LORD, God protected and prospered them. But when they profaned his name and acted in wickedness, God rejected them.

Not that he wanted to, but in holiness he had to for they refused to obey. “My people have turned their backs on me and have refused to return. Even though I diligently taught them, they would not receive instruction or obey” (Jeremiah 32:33, NLT).

God desires obedience. The cross didn’t change that. Jesus said, “If you love me, you will keep my commandments” (Jn. 14:15).

Beloved, it’s holiness that moves God. When his people choose to do that which is honoring to him, he can’t help but respond. It’s our sin that keeps him quiet. Isaiah 59:1-2 says, “Listen! The LORD’S arm is not too weak to save you, nor is his ear too deaf to hear you call. It’s your sins that have cut you off from God” (NLT).

Our sins.

Yet the LORD encouraged Israel with this, “I have swept away your sins like a cloud, I have scattered your offenses like the morning mist. Oh, return to me, for I have paid the price to set you free” (Is. 44:22, NLT).

Return to Him! Not just in word but in deed. In holiness. In righteousness. The government has nothing on God. His presence alone “brings princes to nothing, and makes the rulers of the earth as emptiness” (Is. 40:23).

But why would God act on behalf of a people who live as though they care nothing for him? Profaning not only his name, but his holiness.

Yes, we can pray. Yes, we can ask God to heal our land but without a return to holiness, without a whole hearted seeking of God and a good riddance to the sin we’ve let infiltrate our daily lives for far too long , I sincerely wonder at the outcome.

“This is what the LORD says: “Stop at the crossroads and look around. Ask for the old, godly way, and walk in it. Travel its path, and you will find rest for your souls.” Jeremiah 6:26 NLT  

I can only imagine what God might do if we – his people – asked for the old, godly way, and walked in it. It starts with us friends. It starts with us.

img_3501

Photo provided by @wittersgarden. Follow them on Instagram for more fun inspiration.

Is Your Faith Genuine? A Comprehensive Look at Biblical Faith

Today the word faith gets tossed around Christian circles like a hot potato. You just gotta have faith. We say it regularly and we say it often. And there’s nothing wrong with encouraging one another to have faith. We should!

But with so many uses of the word faith today, I fear we’ve lost the foundation of what genuine biblical faith really is and what it looks like. Hebrews 11:6 says without faith it’s impossible to please God. So obviously faith is key.

Faith in Jesus as God and Savior, the only way, the righteous and perfect Lamb of God, who paid the price of my sin on a cross, conquered death, and rose again. Who is King today and forever. Who holds all things together. Who created all things and knows all things and is before all things. And deserves my allegiance.

Therefore, it looks like obedience.

Jesus said, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word” (John 14:23). “Whoever has my commandments and keeps them, he it is who loves me” (John 14:21). “Whoever does not love me does not keep my words” (John 14:24).

Out of a thankful heart, out of gratitude, out of love – genuine faith says yes. It doesn’t mind the boundaries given by God because it knows they are best, understands they are life giving, and has a desire to please God.

Genuine faith doesn’t proclaim the name of Jesus and then run off and live however it wants to, because genuine faith is produced out of the transforming work of the Holy Spirit. Who convicts and brings us to a place of repentance. Not only sealing us for the day of redemption, but guiding us until we get there. Teaching and reminding us of God’s word.

Producing within the believer the fruit of righteousness (love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, gentleness, goodness, and self-control). Not “sexual immorality, impurity, sensuality, idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, fits of anger, rivalries, dissensions, divisions, envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these” (Gal. 5:19-21).

Because genuine faith does not walk in darkness. It cannot because God is light and his light indwells those who profess His name by way of the Holy Spirit. “If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin” (1 John 1:6-7).

It doesn’t shove God’s commands aside or ignore them or disregard them or make up it’s own way. Neither does it defy God, or chide God, or disrespect God by purposely practicing sin day in and day out. Because it respects grace as the space by which God grants us eternal life, not an open invitation to sin, or a way out of responsibility, but a way into relationship.

Does genuine faith walk this life perfectly? No, absolutely no. Faith knows it will mess up, but believes in a God who forgives when we humble ourselves and confess and seek Him. And genuine faith will confess because genuine faith desires fellowship with God.

Breathing trust in hard places, faith does the hard work fear is unable to do. It stops to listen. It trusts. It looks to the Bible for strength and hope and peace. Convinced God is greater than the enemy, it surrenders to the will of God. And seeks for God’s glory.

Pouring forth prayers, it remains steadfast. Even when the answer isn’t what we thought it would be. Even when we don’t like it. Even when we’re confused. Even when it hurts – genuine faith holds tightly to Jesus.

When the world leans into luck, genuine faith leans into Jesus. When the world has no answers, genuine faith finds answers in Jesus. When the world says you can’t, genuine faith says you can if it’s the will of Jesus.

Genuine faith doesn’t just desire God’s presence later, after all life has been lived, but desires it now, while life is being lived. It responds to the love of Christ in such a way that it’s evident who you believe in.

Confident in the promises of God, confident in the eternal blessings, confident in the work of Christ – genuine biblical faith lives a God honoring life.

So today I ask only one question, is your faith in Christ genuine?

image

*Featured Image provided by Pixabay